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  • Not To Be Opened Until My Death

  • Birdhouse

  • Mikey's Truck

  • Good Dog (Bad Dog)

  • Ladder

  • Rat Wreath

  • Family Tree

  • Mikey at Twelve

  • Home is Where

  • Brooke

  • Norma's Bible

  • Home Crap Home

  • Not a Creature Was Stirring

  • Where Cars Go To Die

  • Ryan (with Pop Tart)

  • Basement Laundry

  • Woods

  • Senior Portraits

  • Sales Map

  • Top Bunk

  • Jake's Grave

  • Trailer

  • Winter Bonfire

  • "Home is Where" exhibition, 2013

  • "Home is Where" exhibition, Oct 2013, Los Angeles

  • "Home is Where" exhibition

  • "Home is Where" exhibition, detail

     I must have been ten or eleven years old when I first ran across the peculiar envelope that bore my grandmother’s shaky handwriting: “not to be opened until my death.” Tucked in her top dresser drawer amidst other valuables, its striking phrase burned into my memory at a young age. I don’t know exactly when, and I don’t know how often, but I know I visited the envelope numerous times, pondering what could be inside. What could be so important (or tragic) that it must be kept secret in this way? 

     I have never been able to shake the hold that piece of paper had over me.  More than just a letter—I was haunted by what it represented.  Loaded with latent meaning, yet withholding its story, the letter is my experience of growing up in Minnesota.  My family roots go deep into the folklore of the rural Northwoods and retain their hold, despite time and distance.  It's a place where my grandfather was a lumberjack, and a place where cars go to die; it's where kids have playtime adventures, and where secrets go to be buried.  It is a merger of myth and memory that grows more complex as time passes. 

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